Tag: mobile trends

Restaurant goers engage in surprising smartphone trends

One in four mobile consumers has at least one mobile app specific to restaurants on their smartphone.

This statistic was discovered by a recent study published by RetailMeNot, Inc., which commissioned Google Consumer Surveys to poll more than 1,000 American consumers on their dining and food habits, including smartphone usage for searches and activities related to restaurants. What the study found was that there were several interesting consumer smartphone trends related to food and dining, such as among the participants surveyed who said that they dine out eight to ten times per week, over two-thirds of these respondents use a restaurant-specific mobile app.

Consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 engage in the most restaurant research on their mobile devices.

The main reasons why restaurant goers use their smartphones is to locate restaurants (53%), browse a menu (49%) and research new restaurants (37%). According to the study, smartphone users in the 25 to 34 age range (millennials) were the most likely to research new restaurants on their mobile phone compared to any other age group (60%).

Mobile marketing is an important part of restaurant-related consumer smartphone trends.

Consumer Smartphone Trends  and RestaurantsIt was discovered that nine out of ten diners who participated in the survey said that they have searched for a restaurant deal at least once. Furthermore, those who earn the most money also tend to be the ones who use online or mobile restaurant deals the most. That being said, eight out of ten consumers who participated admitted that they would likely try a new restaurant if a deal was being offered.

Chief marketing officer in North America for RetailMeNot, Inc., Marissa Tarleton, explained that with the increasing number of consumers turning to their smartphones to assist them with their dining choices, it is becoming more important for restaurants to make the most of mobile advertising.

Mobile marketing technology is a powerful medium when it comes to serving up the right dining content, in the right location, at the right time,” Tarleton said. “When done well, mobile has the ability to drive more diners through their doors and keep them coming back for more.”

The bottom line is that while researching restaurant locations and new venues is among the bigger smartphone trends for American restaurant patrons, it seems that the majority of consumers actively use their mobile devices to take advantage of restaurant deals.

BlackBerry is placing its focus on software as smartphone business trembles

As its handset sales remain lower than the Canadian company had hoped, it has slashed 200 jobs.

The restructuring strategy at BlackBerry has been continuing and, on the heels of a job cut affecting 200 people, the struggling Canadian handset manufacturing is now directing its attention toward software.

The company barely has any mobile device models left on the market shelves and their sales simply aren’t cutting it.

Because of this, BlackBerry appears to be shifting its focus in order to send its resources in the direction of mobile apps for consumers and services for businesses – areas in which the company has managed to excel, over the years. The market share of global smartphone sales currently held by the Canadian mobile device maker is a measly 0.3 percent (as of the third quarter of 2015), according to data from Gartner. That said, when it comes to business security software and other forms of applications, the brand is managing to steadily improve its position.

Even the switch that BlackBerry made to Android does not appear to have been enough to boost its smartphone sales.

Blackberry - Focus on SoftwareJohn Chen, CEO of the company, announced that the company didn’t intend to step away from hardware and, as a part of that strategy, the company released the Priv smartphone, which was based on Android instead of on its own proprietary operating system. The hope was that the more popular mobile platform, in combination with the exponentially larger availability of mobile apps, would be enough to draw consumers back to the brand. Unfortunately, while it did see an increase in sales, it doesn’t look as though it was enough to rescue its hardware business.

The device, itself, is quite unique, and it isn’t difficult to see why the company would feel that it had draw for consumers. Its large 5.4 inch touchscreen also offered a slide-out physical keyboard, for users who would prefer the ease of a mechanical way to type. Its 18 megapixel primary camera (which also allows for 4K video recordings) featured autofocus and an image stabilizer. It is NFC technology enabled and offers about 22 hours of battery with standard device usage. It also comes pre-loaded with security and privacy apps. Its retail US price is $699.

That said, while it doesn’t look like BlackBerry has reached the point where it is phasing its smartphones out of production, predictions look as though its hardware options are going to become slimmer as the year progresses.