mobile tech Archive

What mobile technology does 2017 have on tap?

A device to predict the future may not yet have been released, but industry analysts have their own forecasts.

Mobile technology truly solidified itself last year. It was no longer something new or luxurious. It became the standard and the vast majority of people have it. It is the new worldwide norm.

With a new year underway, industry influencers are weighing in with the direction they think 2017 will take.

This year’s mobile technology market will, after all, be taking a new direction. It’s no longer a matter of making itself mainstream. That has already happened. Fresh directions need to be taken in terms of both hardware and software.

Mobile Technology 2017The entire concept of “mobile” is expanding. It’s not just a smartphone anymore. Last year planted the seed for the widespread growth of virtual reality, augmented reality, smart home gadgets and even the beginnings of artificial intelligence. So now we’re starting to wonder where that leaves us. In which direction will we take all this smart tech?

Industry analysts are taking a hard look at 2017 mobile technology and have some big predictions.

Among those mobile tech forecasts are the following:

• Changes in “reality” – the stage has been set for virtual reality, augmented reality is already hot (greatly thanks to Pokémon Go) and the iPhone 8 is rumored to be heading in a mixed reality direction. AR, VR and mixed reality are all headed toward more mainstream use.

• Artificial intelligence – we may not yet have reached the point where a robot housekeepers will be moving into our homes, but websites will be getting the next best thing through the more commonplace use of AI-based chatbots.

• Mobile Internet of Things – IoT has been a hot topic for the last handful of years but this year will start to see its use in a much more standard way now that smartphones are in the majority of people’s hands, handbags or pockets. For many, the smartphone is the core of a consumer’s connected life. In 2017, they will become a component of a broader smart environment.

To a certain degree, mobile technology will become so popular that it won’t need the word “mobile” to be used in many areas anymore. Online transactions and interactions will continue shifting away from desktop. The question is whether or not 2017 will bring the world to the point that web traffic is simply assumed to be mobile traffic – no specification needed.

Mobile health technology is changing doctor care, says 81 percent of physicians

A recent Merck survey found that smartphones and tablets are altering the way healthcare is provided.

A new survey by Merck Manuals showed that mobile health technology is changing the game. These mobile digital resources are helping doctors and patients in the way that care is provided. The survey revealed that doctors feel confident in their ability to keep up with digital and mobile technology.

The physician participants in the survey said they were ready for the changes being made in information tech.

The main focus of healthcare has been moving toward value and efficiency. In this effort, mobile health technology has considerable potential for doctors. They feel as though they are properly equipped to keep up with this tech shift.

Mobile Health Technology Changing Doctor CareThe survey involved the participation of 220 physicians. It was held at a recent medical conference at which the vast majority of participants said that mobile technology such as smartphones in their offices has changed the way visits occur. This applies both in the case of their own smartphones and those brought by their patients.

More than 4 out of 5 doctors feel mobile health technology has changed the dynamic in their offices.

Among the respondents, 81 percent said that being able to obtain medical information over mobile devices has caused multiple changes in their offices. That said, physicians feel they are prepared for what is to come. They feel tech savvy enough to be able to use the devices and apply them effectively to their patient interactions.

Among those who feel prepared for the tech shift – 75 percent of the respondents – two out of three say they use mobile technology a minimum of ten times per day to access medical information. They feel this tech helps them to keep up with patient interaction needs and demands for time.

Eighty percent of the doctors who use mobile health technology devices at work use information they learn from apps and online information databases. They are using this information to provide themselves with more detailed information when making a diagnosis or recommending a patient treatment plan. Another two out of every three are keeping themselves up to date with medical news over mobile devices.